Ruben Vardanyan: Aurora Prize has united whole nation

08:16 • 09.02.17



The Aurora initiative is a very ambitious project, which requires a lot of constant work to address global problems and challenges, and we are still at the very beginning, Ruben Vardanyan, a Russian-Armenian businessman who is a co-founder of the project, said in an exclusive interview with Tert.am,

 
Although you had put a lot of energy into creating this award, before last year's award ceremony you admitted you thought putting it into practice wasn't realistic. How did you feel personally, standing in the wings, as the event concluded?


When the ceremony ended all the members of our team, myself included, were completely exhausted. In the final days leading up to the event, we had hardly slept. There had been quite a lot of difficulties that stopped us enjoying the event to the fullest, although fortunately they weren’t noticeable to anyone else.

 

After we’d seen off finalists, the winner and the guests, I was on my way home when I was approached by an ordinary resident of Yerevan. He told me something that became very dear to me. He said that what he had seen had made him feel proud to be Armenian.


We want the ideas of humanism, gratitude, helping others and celebration of the human spirit to become important across the world, and also in Armenia, so that they provide an impetus for rethinking ourselves. The Aurora initiative is a very ambitious project, which requires a lot of constant work to address global problems and challenges, and we are still at the very beginning. That meeting helped me to understand that what we are doing is very, very important and that our efforts are not in vain.

Now, Armenia and the world are looking forward to the second awards ceremony. What difficulties and problems are you facing at the moment, what parts of the preparatory work for the awards ceremony are most satisfying this year?


This is a unique project, and although we went through a lot last year and things are supposed to be easier the second time around, we are now facing new challenges. The world today is confronted with a set of deep internal and external crises. We are witnessing a large-scale crisis of the world’s elite, a loss of trust in government and its institutions, changes in the traditional moral compass. And we Armenians, as a nation overcoming all of these “diseases” ourselves, can and should help in this world. Therefore, it is important to turn Aurora into a global humanitarian movement. We still have a lot of important and fundamental things to do in order to continue the development of what we have started, and to create the right perception of what we are doing. Yes, the disaster we have experienced puts pressure on us, but although we have to remember our past, we still need to look forward. I am sure that we as a nation have something to give to the world, as we have done many times before in the history of humankind.


It is also important to maintain the high international standards that we originally set; this year more people, countries, candidates and projects are involved in the initiative, and we have to make sure everything is done properly across the board. After all, the Aurora project is not just about a prize. The award ceremony is just the tip of the iceberg, the part most visible to the public. Both beforehand and afterwards, we carry out a huge amount of events including the Humanitarian Index, a special study devoted to the public perception of major humanitarian problems, and the Aurora Dialogues, an international platform for discussing pressing issues. Last year, the Dialogues were held in Matenadaran and brought together leading humanitarians and philanthropists from across the world. In addition, we have announced several creative competitions for young people; we also implement humanitarian, educational and research projects to help children, refugees and other people at risk worldwide.


In addition, this year we moved the date of the ceremony to May 28, the Day of the First Republic of Armenia. By doing this we want to show that, despite the consequences of the genocide, destruction and destitution of World War One, the surviving Armenians weren’t afraid to declare their independence. Their actions are the best example of how people who survived catastrophe can quickly unite and start raising their homeland from ruins.


The eve of the ceremony, May 27, is graduation day at UWC Dilijan. Of course, it is complicated to have two large and important events at the same time, although they are related. Children from 72 countries attend the school and many of them are from regions where there are serious political, military and religious crises. For such children, who have had tragic experiences, the values and ideas of the Aurora Humanitarian Initiative are especially relevant and important.


The number of candidates for the award has increased this year. Although the candidates’ names won’t be known until later, I would like to ask you whether this year’s candidates are different from last year’s, and in what way are they different? To what extent do their stories inspire you?


That’s right, the names of the finalists will be announced on 24 April. We were very worried that we might get a lot of repetitive stories, less unique ones, the second time round. After all, in the first year we had accounts not only about things that happened recently, but also many decades ago. We worried that the stories will all come from the same region, mainly from Africa, because there are more situations there where you need the help of people with a mission, those who save the lives of others.


Fortunately, those fears were not realized. We got three times more submissions than last year, of whom 254 were identified as unique candidates, which is very important. The geographical range expanded significantly, entries in 13 languages were sent by people from 66 countries. The largest number of submissions were received from Armenia, the United States, Russia, Germany, Egypt, Pakistan, Nigeria, France, Nepal, Kenya, India, the Philippines and the United Kingdom.


When you read these wonderful stories, you realize that living in a normal civilized society today, you have no idea what’s going on around you. Things like the struggle against human trafficking and the recruitment of children to fight in wars and many other terrible things that, unfortunately, still exist.


Through the Aurora prize, you also wanted to change our way of thinking, to force us to rid ourselves of the victim complex and, like the Aurora Prize candidates themselves, look to the future, leaving our problems behind us. Although I think it’s too early to ask you this question, I’m still going to ask it: how is everything going and what have you achieved so far?


This is a long process, and we still have a lot to do. Success will be measured not only by the ceremony, but also through many of our other projects.


I think that we have really moved forward. Perhaps the most interesting thing is that after its first year, Aurora was one of the initiatives which united Armenians from Armenia and the diaspora, and from Western and Eastern Armenia. This is one of few projects which actually united people not just within the country, but at the level of the whole nation.


In just a short space of time, the Aurora Prize gained the attention of many countries. Are there any new elements planned for the award ceremony this year? We would also like to learn more about activities that are going to be held in other countries, what are your expectations of them?


I wouldn’t like to reveal any elements of the award ceremony because the most important thing right now is to create a tradition, put down the foundations.


You know that the Aurora Humanitarian Initiative is planned to run for eight years, from 2015 to 2023. This represents the period from 1915 to 1923, when the annihilation of Armenians in their historic homeland occurred in one way or another. And we are planning a lot of events, not only in Armenia but also abroad – in Europe, Asia, Latin America, the Middle East, the United States, because we see great interest on the part of various institutions, organizations and countries.


However, it is too early to talk about that, right now it is important that as many people as possible take part in this movement. We have announced various competitions: a photo contest, short film competition, the possibility of writing a letter to the Aurora hero and a creative contest for children. So we hope that more and more people will become involved.


It is important that the Aurora Humanitarian Initiative is not just the project of co-founders Ruben Vardanyan, Vartan Gregorian and Noubar Afeyan, but a joint project of all those who are involved with us. I am very grateful to Samvel Karapetyan, Artur Dzhanibekyan, Albert Avdolyan, Vladimir Avetissian, Sergey Sarkisov and many other donors, including non-Armenians, who are participating in it.


We can’t deny that the participation of the world famous actor George Clooney in your project as co-chair of the Aurora Prize Selection Committee has played a big role in the recognition of the award. We would like to find out if there will be any other famous people at the award ceremony and related events in Armenia this year. Do you have agreements with any celebrities?


I agree that George Clooney has played a major role, and it comes from his direct involvement in the process. And we also help him from our side. I support his initiative The Sentry, and sit on the advisory board of Not On Our Watch, the philanthropic organization run by George and his partners Matt Damon, Brad Pitt, Don Cheadle and others.


A lot of people are involved in our project, famous and not so famous – those who really help it. We don’t want to turn it into a show, and we think it’s important that as many humanitarian organizations as possible join us.


The most important people at the award ceremony are those who risked their own lives to save others, such as Marguerite Barankitse (2016 Aurora Prize Laureate, who saved about 30,000 children during the genocide in Burundi Ed).


You said that one of the competitions that has been added to the list of initiatives and activities is the Letter to the Aurora Hero. As a way of concluding our interview, I would also like to hear what you have to say to somebody who wants to become the Aurora hero.


There is a very important philosophy here. I don’t think that we can all be heroes, that’s very difficult. These people have very difficult lives; it’s extremely hard to risk yourself to save others. But it is important to have a sense of connection, and that you too can help.


A survey we did as part of the Aurora Humanitarian Index showed that there is a gap between what people feel in relation to humanitarian issues, and the steps they are willing to take to resolve them. For example, most people are sympathetic to refugees and think that they need help, but doubt that they can change things themselves, and believe that it’s up to states and international organizations to solve humanitarian problems.


In this sense it is very important that people are engaged and involved as much as possible. We understand that not everyone can be a hero, like Marguerite or Dr. Tom Catena (finalist of the inaugural Aurora Prize award, the only doctor permanently based on the border with South Sudan who provides medical care to more than half a million local people Ed]. People who really battle with humanitarian problems are very rare and unfortunately not many people know about them. But we can help them, we can make sure that their story becomes known to the general public, so that selflessly helping others becomes part of our culture. So that we don’t just discuss the latest gossip, but know what is going on in the world, are proud of these people and help them to the best of our capabilities.

Hripsime Hovhannisyan





Загрузка...

LATEST NEWSAll Today news

18:10 • 20/07

Conte to sue Chelsea over his sacking

18:02 • 20/07

Russia fears hypersonic missile leaks

17:37 • 20/07

Armenian president hosts delegation from Ernst & Young

17:05 • 20/07

Michael Douglas reveals adventures of 101-year-old father

16:44 • 20/07

Stronger democracy-building to make Armenia internationally attractive – opinion

15:53 • 20/07

Artsakh’s direct engagement in peace talks ‘indispensable’ to future progress - Pashinyan  

15:10 • 20/07

Bitcoin to soar as ’digital gold’ of the future

14:56 • 20/07

Six US senators seek to restrict loans to Turkey over 'pastor' ruling

13:47 • 20/07

Armenia must raise ‘landlocked country’ status on United Nations' agenda - expert

12:04 • 20/07

‘Architects of Denial’ team to be Honored at 2018 ANCA-WR Gala

11:56 • 20/07

Armenia to join NATO military exercises in Georgia  

11:37 • 20/07

Four indicted with murder in slaying of rapper XXXTentacion

11:24 • 20/07

Armenia needs snap parliamentary elections until April, says vice prime minister

10:13 • 20/07

Hraparak: Fifty country leaders invited to La Francophonie summit in Yerevan

09:34 • 20/07

Eleven dead as US 'duck boat' capsizes in Missouri

09:13 • 20/07

Trump invites Putin to visit US in autumn

18:51 • 19/07

Ruben Vardanyan buys 50% of Atlanta business forum’s shares

17:19 • 19/07

Putin attacks at Trump's summer critics

16:58 • 19/07

Lewis Hamilton extends contract with Mercedes until 2020

16:52 • 19/07

Yerevan to host Sixth Watermelon Festival on July 22

16:18 • 19/07

Iranian, Armenian foreign ministries hold consular meeting in Tehran

15:57 • 19/07

FIBA bans 13 players after basketball brawl

15:31 • 19/07

State Revenue Committee to ease tax burden for SMEs

14:54 • 19/07

British police halt attack against Theresa May

14:19 • 19/07

Royal Family nicknames revealed

13:58 • 19/07

BBC launches live news streaming on Yahoo Japan

13:47 • 19/07

Kim Kardashian makes million dollars on new fragrance line after spending $0 on advertising  

12:35 • 19/07

Serious test to Armenian-Russian alliance: Pashinyan condemns unannounced drills as sabotage ‘targeting state sovereignty’

11:35 • 19/07

Ryanair cancels 600 flights over cabin crew strike in Belgium, Portugal and Spain, affect potentially almost 50,000 passengers

11:11 • 19/07

Australian PM says Pope must sack archbishop over child sex abuse scandal

10:31 • 19/07

Turkey announces end to state of emergency after two years

10:17 • 19/07

Facebook defends Holocaust deniers’ right to be wrong

10:09 • 19/07

Israel approves controversial ‘Jewish state’ law

09:55 • 19/07

NATO chief says Georgia, not Russia, must decide on NATO membership

09:49 • 19/07

Trump holds Putin ‘responsible’ for election meddling

09:32 • 19/07

UK House of Lords ratifies EU-Armenia agreement

09:11 • 19/07

Khachatur Kokobelyan: United States is interested in boosting investments in Armenia  

18:15 • 18/07

Armenian society ‘enthusiastic’ about new government's social reforms – expert

17:36 • 18/07

Trump says there is 'no time limit' for North Korea to denuclearise

17:26 • 18/07

Richard Mills: US considers increasing assistance to Armenia

16:24 • 18/07

Aerospace titans Boeing and Airbus top $110bn in orders at Farnborough

16:02 • 18/07

Russian pranksters' call with Juncker reveals what EU chief thinks about Trump

15:52 • 18/07

Liverpool agree on world record fee for Roma’s Brazilian goalkeeper

15:43 • 18/07

Battle of jets: Putin's lavish plane interior - including gold-plated toilet - is revealed... so how does it compare to Air Force One?

15:25 • 18/07

Trump-Putin summit ‘good restraint’ for powers capitalizing on conflicts – debate

14:02 • 18/07

Russian military base conducts full-scale exercises in Armenia ‘without prior warning’

12:06 • 18/07

Harrison Ford Eyes ‘Call of the Wild’

11:43 • 18/07

Armenian vice premier attends high-level UN political forum in New York

11:08 • 18/07

Google to face Giant Android fine

10:55 • 18/07

Armenia, Nagorno-Karabakh 'must enter into political-military cooperation pact'  

10:25 • 18/07

Building collapse in Delhi suburb killing at least two

10:15 • 18/07

Hraparak: Russia has special message for Pashinyan after Brussels summit

09:41 • 18/07

Trump reverses remark on Russia meddling

09:34 • 18/07

Zhamanak: Emergency minister to run for Yerevan mayor?

09:13 • 18/07

ANCA seeks US-Armenia social security Agreement

17:50 • 17/07

Government to submit ‘specific proposals’ to EU, says prime minister’s spokesperson

17:15 • 17/07

Spain captain Ramos proposes to girlfriend

16:58 • 17/07

Armenia’s ‘velvet revolution’ featured in museum exhibits

16:16 • 17/07

George Clooney made $322 million last year to become highest-earning actor in world

15:55 • 17/07

Rolls-Royce building future-style flying taxi 

15:25 • 17/07

President: We have positive outlook on Armenia’s great future

14:27 • 17/07

Pashinyan, Ter-Petrosyan discuss developments in Karabakh peace

13:57 • 17/07

Trump praises Turkey’s Erdogan for ‘doing things the right way’ in defense spending

13:45 • 17/07

Brent crude oil recovers in Asia trade after slumping to 3-month lows

13:28 • 17/07

Russia to ease citizenship rules for Armenians

12:46 • 17/07

Zhamanak: Fight against corruption ‘wasted effort’ to resolve past crimes

11:48 • 17/07

‘Don’t hold US-Russia ties hostage to internal politics’, Putin says after meeting with Trump

11:29 • 17/07

Henry Morgenthau III passes away  

11:19 • 17/07

Judges becoming ‘increasingly independent’ in Armenia, says president of Supreme Judicial Council

09:57 • 17/07

From a 35-arch ancient aqueduct to an eye-popping 20-mile road crossing: World's most incredible bridges revealed

09:29 • 17/07

Flying volcano injures 23 in Hawaii

09:20 • 17/07

Trump under fire after Putin summit

17:59 • 16/07

Trump sits down with Putin after denouncing past US policy on Russia

17:49 • 16/07

How Israel, in dark of night, torched its way to Iran’s nuclear secrets – The New York Times

17:17 • 16/07

Mission: Impossible-Fallout: Critics praise dangerous stunts performed by Tom Cruise who injured his ankle on set

16:53 • 16/07

Pashinyan 'politically inclined to peer-to-peer dialogue’ – diplomat  

16:07 • 16/07

French President Macron meets plenty of fans at World Cup final

15:55 • 16/07

Amazon Prime Day deals ‘deceptive’

15:14 • 16/07

No Armenian-Azerbaijani ministerial talks agreed in Brussels – MFA spokesperson

14:31 • 16/07

Ucom offers more Viasat Family channels to subscribers

14:05 • 16/07

Switalski: EU needs Armenia's 'specific proposals' to revise mutual agenda

12:46 • 16/07

Yerevan city council fails to secure quorom to elect new mayor

12:10 • 16/07

Erdogan: Turkish citizens ‘saved dignity of democracy’ during 2016 coup attempt

10:39 • 16/07

Two fans die as France's World Cup celebrations are marred by police violence

10:33 • 16/07

Italy to allow migrants to land in Sicily

10:05 • 16/07

Iran nuclear deal: US rejects EU plea for lifting sanctions

09:34 • 16/07

Trump calls EU 'foe' of the United States

09:18 • 16/07

France named 2018 FIFA World Cup winner

15:48 • 14/07

Facebook, Twitter, Alphabet to testify at US House hearing

15:15 • 14/07

Armenian parliament vice speaker thanks Poland for support to Genocide recognition efforts

14:25 • 14/07

11 Armenian companies named conscientious taxpayers  

13:50 • 14/07

Nancy Sinatra, Frank Sinatra's first wife, dies at 101

13:16 • 14/07

Two suspects released in Hrant Dink murder case

13:08 • 14/07

Armen Sarkissian issues congratulations to Emmanuel Macron on French national holiday

12:51 • 14/07

Armenian man killed in gang attack in Tbilisi

12:30 • 14/07

Congressman Sherman continues pressure to secure new US-Armenia tax treaty

12:14 • 14/07

168 Zham: Will Pashinyan meet Europe’s expectations?

11:06 • 14/07

Ronaldo back to Madrid

10:59 • 14/07

Elegant Melania Trump meets with Elizabeth II

10:38 • 14/07

Hraparak: Armenian authorities agree on timeframes of snap parliamentary election